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Nonprofit Education

3 Ways to Get Corporate Sponsorship for Your Nonprofit

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Getting corporate sponsorship for your nonprofit fundraising event is a great idea for many reasons. Not only are you likely to score some free promotional marketing for your event, (as they’ll probably be doing some advertising on their end), it’s also a sure way to add value to your event. The more buzz and hype you can get, the better for your turnout and ultimately, better for your nonprofit.

But the question remains, ‘how to get corporate sponsors for your nonprofit’? Rest easy. There are plenty of companies that donate to nonprofits. We’ve put together the top 3 ways to acquire corporate sponsorship to make it simple for you.

  1. Get Ahead of the Game: The best way to ensure you’re covered with how to get corporate sponsors for your nonprofit is to make moves months before the event is scheduled. Who you want corporate sponsorship from is one of the first things you’ll want to hammer out, that way, you can explore your options. 

    By giving corporations ample time to agree to this partnership, everyone is more prepared and the event is more likely to run more smoothly. Plus, this allows you to have your number one pick of sponsorship. Who will best get your nonprofit’s name out there? Choose wisely and pick early. Don’t panic, but you’re probably not the only nonprofit seeking corporate sponsorship in your area. 

    By being prepared, organized, and staying on top of things, you’re that much closer to establishing corporate sponsorship from a business that best suits you. You may not have luck with the first several companies you reach out to. Don’t be discouraged! Stay positive and creative and keep exploring your options. If you allow yourself several months to gain sponsorship, this won’t create unnecessary stress.

    Two pairs of shoes on sidewalk with writing that reads, 'Passion Led Us Here'


  1. Networking is Key: Every business and nonprofit owner understands that networking is vital to your company’s success and how to get corporate sponsors. Don’t underestimate any corporation’s interest in your nonprofit. If you believe in your nonprofit, you have the ability to make others believe in it, too. 

    Networking is as simple as putting yourself out there and being consistent, confident, and, at times, charmingly stubborn. Stand behind your nonprofit and come prepared with a pitch that can’t be ignored. You should know the ins and outs of your company and be ready to handle any question about your mission, your history, particular milestones, and whatever else the corporation you’re seeking sponsorship from might come at you with. It’s your responsibility to do your homework and be able to address any issues, concerns, or whatever else companies that donate to nonprofits may be interested in knowing.

    Man and woman discuss nonprofit sponsorship in front of the computer.


  1. “Shop” Local & Make Your Physical Presence Known: A fantastic tip to know about how to get corporate sponsors is to seek sponsorship from local businesses. People appreciate community and prioritizing sponsorship from a local business breeds undeniable reciprocity. Capitalize on this! Visit the shop or restaurant you wish to sponsor you and get creative.

    An in-person, face-to-face meeting from a nonprofit owner seeking sponsorship is far more memorable than an impersonal email. Do your research on the company and be curious and interested in what they do. Make your intentions known. It’s a compliment and an honor for the business you’re asking to sponsor you. Again, don’t become discouraged if they aren’t in a position to help you out this time around. Creating strong bonds in your community has far-reaching positive implications.

Remember, sponsoring a nonprofit is a good look for a corporation, so this is an ‘everybody wins’ scenario. Don’t be shy asking for a proverbial back scratch— it’s a two-way street and both parties have much to gain. Good luck and happy hunting.